Prophecy: Stadiums full of people in a revival

Prophet: Paul Cain

The attribution for who made this prophecy is undisputed as is its basic idea. Paul Cain said he had recurring visions of the stadiums. One rumor is he saw the vision “over one hundred times.” This number may have been estimated or inflated. His own website summarized the visions as “ongoing, recurring.”

Cain’s own detailed account was:

 

In February 1989, at the Anaheim Vineyard during a conference, I prophesied a time when athletic stadiums and arenas would be filled with God’s people preaching the gospel and healing the sick in extraordinary fashion.

In my vision I saw ambulances bringing in the worst medical cases, the local hospitals being emptied to deliver their patients to these events, and the dead (dead people!) being raised by an army of nameless and faceless Christians releasing a wave of miraculous healings and conversions.

GodTV, in its eulogy after he passed away in 2019, said: “Paul lived to see the start of the mass stadium revivals he prophesied.” This is a very liberal interpretation of history. They said it happened at Azusa Now when 60,000 people gathered on April 9, 2016 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. But these were Christians. How many were healed? Who was raised from the dead? Were there ambulances?

It is a very optimistic prophecy. It is basically a best-case scenario prophecy. This type is always suspect. Cain made his already-fantastic prophecy even more fantastic:

This vision encompassed multiple venues over an extended period and spoke of God’s glory being released in an unprecedented manner and on a scale that had not been witnessed before….

In my vision, the international media were reporting the amazing events as they took place. This was the news of the day: every channel, every station, and every nation.

This was not an isolated Christian event, the kind that is well known and publicized in the Christian community, yet even the immediate neighbors of the event have no clue what is happening inside; rather, this was a series of events that would affect the world and the communities around the stadiums and arenas.

A History of Revival Prophecies

It must be noted that Paul Cain gave another revival prophecy around the same time he made the 1989 stadiums prophecy. In either 1989 and/or 1990 he prophesied revival was about to start in England. It never happened, much to John Wimber’s regret.

About thirty years later it still had not happened. Not too long before he died, Cain returned to the UK, and people thought it might happen then, including Cain. It did not.

Was the stadiums revival word true while the UK revival one was false? Or were they both false?

A closer look at Cain’s revival prophecy record shows he also prophesied a healing revival for 1996. It also never happened.

Believers

It seems like a lot of people believe the Cain stadiums prophecy because they want to believe it. It would be a dream come true. There is a bias to trust it by those who want to see it happen. Peter Vandever, the blogger at Azusa Report who is steeped in Kansas City dreams, confidently declares Stadium Christianity is my Eschatology.

Recurring

The disclaimer here as always is we don’t know if Cain had the vision as he claimed and/or if he had it several times. He has been accused of lying by leaders so it’s possible. Assuming for the sake of discussion his claimed spiritual experiences did happen, the essential component of the prophecy in terms of credibility is they happened more than once.

To some people seeing a vision once is enough to believe it. To others it needs to be more than once to be credible. But the idea that it happened many times or even 100 times should push it past the realm of any doubt whatsoever.

The problem with this belief is that re-occurrence of any spiritual experience, whether it is a vision or anything else, in and of itself is not infallible proof something is from God according to the Bible.

One person could have one vision once and it be from God. Another person could have one vision 1,000 times and it not be from God. Frequency is just not the standard. You could fairly argue that having the same vision more than once makes it more likely it is from God than having it only once, but it’s not foolproof.

Significance

The stadiums prophecy is fairly innocuous. It makes little difference to most people whether they believe it or not. It is unlikely to affect any decision-making. It is mostly a cheer-leading prophecy to wind up a crowd and get people excited.

Conditions

It is a very strong word in some ways because it forecasts extreme power, but at the same time it is also very weak, because it says nothing about personal cost or special method. It is not clear if it is just going to happen as a sovereign move of God, or God’s people actually need to do something special to get something special. If Cain really believed it was from God why didn’t he find out and tell us?

 

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